Travel

Myths about Dubai & The UAE

October 25, 2014

 

  • The myth:Everyone is super rich
  • The truth:Everyone is not super rich! It is true that the brilliant rules of the UAE allow a tax free income, but really in the UAE, you see people from all walks of life, making all sorts of money. Maids who work in the homes of locals or expats can notoriously make as little as 1000 AED a month. It is even common to see locals from all sorts of the financial spectrum, some seeming to have a very healthy income, and those who have a modest one.There is most certainly money to be made, but you still have to live to a budget as you would in any country, you’ve also got to really try to stick to it as there are far too many places to spend it!

 

  • The myth:Everyone lives in 5 star and 7 star high rises or compounds
  • The truth:Everyone does not live in 5-7 star high rises or homes, however there are many middle class homes that look like compounds. There are also many apartment complexes.

 

  • The myth:The weather is too hot to live/ do anything here
  • The truth: The weather is hot & humid, but you are still able to live, explore, go to the beach, and tour the city

 

  • The myth:Every woman must cover in Burkas, head scarves, Hijabs
  • The truth:This is one myth that is widespread and comes to the forefront of most people’s minds when thinking about Arab or Muslim-majority countries. The UAE is widely considered one of the most forward thinking countries with regards to gender relations in the Arab and Muslim world. Unlike the UAE’s neighbour, women here are allowed to drive. Women also make up half of the university population and are full participants in the workforce. Emirati women wear abaya (voluminous black gown) and shayla (a head covering) but unlike Saudi Arabia or Iran it is not enforced but more of a national custom. You will even sometimes run in to Emirati ladies who do not wear the shayla or even the abaya. Expat women are not expected or asked to wear abaya or shayla and are pretty much allowed to wear whatever it is they like provided that it is modest i.e. no overt displays of cleavage or short-shorts (unless it is in the appropriate place like a beach). Of course is also truly depends on where you are in the Emirates. Dubai is a lot less conservative than Abu Dhabi, and Abu Dhabi is less conservative than Sharjah. So, the best thing to do is to just adjust your clothing to wherever you’re going in the Emirates so not to cause offence.

 

  • The myth: Everyone drives sports cars
  • The truth:Everyone does not drive a sports car, however I saw many many nice ones, much the same as driving down South Beach in Miami. Although the cars in Dubai were most likely own and not rented

 

  • The myth:Dubai is a country
  • The truth:Dubai is not a country, it is a city of the UAE. Many also think Dubai is the capital, Abu Dhabi is the capital of the UAE, which is smaller than Dubai

 

  • The myth: It is not a massive sandpit with oil refineries everywhere
  • The truth: Dubai is very much a city like any other. It actually is probably more up to date and modern in architecture, construction and technology than most other major cities. Abu Dhabi is surprisingly green, as is Al-Ain. The desert that surrounds Abu Dhabi city and Dubai is yellowish with lots of little plants growing all over. You’ve really got to drive out a little bit to find real desert.

 

  • The myth: No meat country, Dubai is a Muslim country, therefore haram (forbidden) meat is banned.
  • The truth: The UAE is a forward-thinking country that has found a way to successfully cater for its expat population while respecting the laws and traditions of its own people. Most supermarkets have specific non-Muslim sections selling otherwise forbidden meat products, and numerous restaurants also have licences.

 

  • The myth: You cannot drink in Dubai & you need to have a liquor licence in order to buy alcoholic beverages from liquor shops.
  • The truth: Alcohol is sold in hotels, most hotels have clubs and bars inside them, and in some stores in Abu Dhabi and Dubai (and other Emirates that have fleeky hotels). Most other states allow the selling of alcohol, but like Abu Dhabi require a alcohol license (although, if truth be told, it is hardly enforced). Sharjah, I believe, is the only Emirate that is completely dry. It is worth mentioning though, that during holy nights or special holidays within the Islamic Calendar hotels, bars and restaurants enforce dry nights.

 

  • The myth: All public displays of affection are banned.
  • The truth: This is false but there’s one thing you must remember: displays of affection with someone to whom you are not married are illegal under the UAE penal law of 1987. You will see plenty of married couples holding hands in the malls and our advice would be, if you’re married, to be respectful of local customs and not go any further than that.

 

  • The myth: All food is imported
  • The truth: It is easy for one to assume that livestock and crops cannot possibly grow in the arid desert climate of Dubai. Indeed, most foods in supermarkets are brought in from all over the world, from Australia to Zambia. However, there has been a significant shift in recent years towards more sustainable produce from local farmlands. More than 80 different varieties of crops are grown in the UAE and in 2012, almost 60,000 tonnes of cow milk and 15,000 tonnes of chicken were produced in Dubai.

What is your perception of Dubai and The UAE?

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